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Agatha Christie

Dame Agatha Christie, DBE
Born Agatha Mary Clarissa Miller
15 September 1890(1890-09-15)
Torquay, Devon, England
Died 12 January 1976(1976-01-12) (aged 85)
Wallingford, Oxfordshire, England
Pen name Mary Westmacott
Occupation Novelist
Nationality British
Genres Murder mystery, Thriller, Crime fiction, Detective, Romances
Literary movement Golden Age of Detective Fiction
Spouse(s) Archibald Christie (1914–1928)
Max Mallowan (1930–1976)

Dame Agatha Christie, DBE, (15 September 1890 – 12 January 1976), was a British crime writer of novels, short stories and plays. She also wrote romances under the name Mary Westmacott, but she is best remembered for her 80 detective novels—especially those featuring Hercule Poirot and Miss Jane Marple—and her successful West End theatre plays.

According to the Guinness Book of World Records, Christie is the best-selling writer of books of all time and, with William Shakespeare, the best-selling author of any kind. Only the Bible has sold more than her roughly four billion copies of novels.[1] According to UNESCO, Christie is the most translated individual author, with only the collective corporate works of Walt Disney Productions surpassing her.[2] Her books have been translated into at least 103 languages.[3]

Christie’s stage play The Mousetrap holds the record for the longest initial run: it opened at the Ambassadors Theatre in London on 25 November 1952 and as of 2011 is still running after more than 23,000 performances. In 1955, Christie was the first recipient of the Mystery Writers of America‘s highest honour, the Grand Master Award, and in the same year Witness for the Prosecution was given an Edgar Award by the MWA for Best Play. Most of her books and short stories have been filmed, some many times over (Murder on the Orient Express, Death on the Nile and 4.50 From Paddington for instance), and many have been adapted for television, radio, video games and comics.

In 1968, Booker Books, a subsidiary of the agri-industrial conglomerate Booker-McConnell, bought a 51 percent stake in Agatha Christie Limited, the private company that Christie had set up for tax purposes. Booker later increased its stake to 64 percent. In 1998, Booker sold its shares to Chorion, a company whose portfolio also includes the literary estates of Enid Blyton and Dennis Wheatley.[4]

In 2004, a 5,000-word story entitled The Incident of the Dog’s Ball was found in the attic of the author’s daughter. This story was the original version of the novel Dumb Witness. It was published in Britain in September 2009 in John Curran’s Agatha Christie’s Secret Notebooks: Fifty Years Of Mysteries, alongside another newly discovered Poirot story called The Capture of Cerberus (a story with the same title, but a different plot, to that published in The Labours Of Hercules).[5] On November 10, 2009, Reuters announced that The Incident of the Dog’s Ball will be published by The Strand Magazine.[6]


Life and career

Early life and first marriage

Agatha Mary Clarissa Miller was born in Torquay, Devon, England, U.K.. Her mother, Clarissa Margaret Boehmer, was the daughter of a British Army captain[7] but had been sent as a child to live with her own mother’s sister, who was the second wife of a wealthy American. Eventually Margaret married her stepfather’s son from his first marriage, Frederick Alvah Miller, an American stockbroker. Thus, the two women Agatha called “Grannie” were sisters. Despite her father’s nationality as a “New Yorker” and her aunt’s relation to the Pierpont Morgans, Agatha never claimed United States citizenship or connection.[8]

Agatha was the youngest of three. The Millers had two other children: Margaret Frary Miller (1879–1950), called Madge, who was eleven years Agatha’s senior, and Louis Montant Miller (1880–1929), called Monty, ten years older than Agatha. Later, in her autobiography, Agatha would refer to her brother as “an amiable scapegrace of a brother”.[9]

During the First World War, she worked at a hospital as a nurse; she liked the profession, calling it “one of the most rewarding professions that anyone can follow”.[10] She later worked at a hospital pharmacy, a job that influenced her work, as many of the murders in her books are carried out with poison.

Despite a turbulent courtship, on Christmas Eve 1914 Agatha married Archibald Christie, an aviator in the Royal Flying Corps.[11] The couple had one daughter, Rosalind Hicks. They divorced in 1928, two years after Christie discovered her husband was having an affair.

Her first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, came out in 1920. During this marriage, Agatha published six novels, a collection of short stories, and a number of short stories in magazines.


In late 1926, Agatha’s husband, Archie, revealed that he was in love with another woman, Nancy Neele, and wanted a divorce. On December 8, 1926, the couple quarreled, and Archie Christie left their house Styles in Sunningdale, Berkshire, to spend the weekend with his mistress at Godalming, Surrey. That same evening Agatha disappeared from her home, leaving behind a letter for her secretary saying that she was going to Yorkshire. Her disappearance caused an outcry from the public, many of whom were admirers of her novels. Despite a massive manhunt, she was not found for eleven days.[12]

On December 19, 1926, Agatha was identified as a guest at the Swan Hydropathic Hotel (now the Old Swan Hotel[13]) in Harrogate, Yorkshire, where she was registered as ‘Mrs Teresa Neele’ from Cape Town. Agatha gave no account of her disappearance. Although two doctors had diagnosed her as suffering from psychogenic fugue, opinion remains divided as to the reasons for her disappearance. One suggestion is that she had suffered a nervous breakdown brought about by a natural propensity for depression, exacerbated by her mother’s death earlier that year and the discovery of her husband’s infidelity. Public reaction at the time was largely negative, with many believing it a publicity stunt while others speculated she was trying to make the police believe her husband had killed her.[14]

Author Jared Cade interviewed numerous witnesses and relatives for his sympathetic biography, Agatha Christie and the Missing Eleven Days, and provided a substantial amount of evidence to suggest that Christie planned the entire disappearance to embarrass her husband, never thinking it would escalate into the melodrama it became.[15]

Second marriage and later life

Agatha Christie’s room at the Hotel Pera Palace, where she wrote Murder on the Orient Express.

In 1930, Christie married archaeologist Max Mallowan (Sir Max from 1968) after joining him in an archaeological dig. Their marriage was especially happy in the early years and remained so until Christie’s death in 1976.[16] In 1977, Mallowan married his longtime associate, Barbara Parker.[16]

Christie frequently used familiar settings for her stories. Christie’s travels with Mallowan contributed background to several of her novels set in the Middle East. Other novels (such as And Then There Were None) were set in and around Torquay, where she was born. Christie’s 1934 novel Murder on the Orient Express was written in the Hotel Pera Palace in Istanbul, Turkey, the southern terminus of the railway. The hotel maintains Christie’s room as a memorial to the author.[17] The Greenway Estate in Devon, acquired by the couple as a summer residence in 1938, is now in the care of the National Trust.

Christie often stayed at Abney Hall in Cheshire, which was owned by her brother-in-law, James Watts. She based at least two of her stories on the hall: the short story The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding, which is in the story collection of the same name, and the novel After the Funeral. “Abney became Agatha’s greatest inspiration for country-house life, with all the servants and grandeur which have been woven into her plots. The descriptions of the fictional Chimneys, Stoneygates, and other houses in her stories are mostly Abney in various forms.”[18]

During the Second World War, Christie worked in the pharmacy at University College Hospital of University College, London, where she acquired a knowledge of poisons that she put to good use in her post-war crime novels. For example, the use of thallium as a poison was suggested to her by UCH Chief Pharmacist Harold Davis (later appointed Chief Pharmacist at the UK Ministry of Health), and in The Pale Horse, published in 1961, she employed it to dispatch a series of victims, the first clue to the murder method coming from the victims’ loss of hair. So accurate was her description of thallium poisoning that on at least one occasion it helped solve a case that was baffling doctors.[19]

To honour her many literary works, she was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire in the 1956 New Year Honours.[20] The next year, she became the President of the Detection Club.[21] In the 1971 New Year Honours she was promoted Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire,[22] three years after her husband had been knighted for his archeological work in 1968.[23] They were one of the few married couples where both partners were honoured in their own right. From 1968, due to her husband’s knighthood, Christie could also be styled as Lady Agatha Mallowan, or simply Lady Mallowan.

Agatha Christie’s gravestone in Cholsey.

From 1971 to 1974, Christie’s health began to fail, although she continued to write. In 1975, sensing her increasing weakness, Christie signed over the rights of her most successful play, The Mousetrap, to her grandson.[16] Recently, using experimental textual tools of analysis, Canadian researchers have suggested that Christie may have begun to suffer from Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia.[24][25][26][27]

Agatha Christie died on January 12, 1976 at age 85 from natural causes at her Winterbrook House in the north of Cholsey parish, adjoining Wallingford in Oxfordshire (formerly part of Berkshire). She is buried in the nearby churchyard of St Mary’s, Cholsey.

Christie’s only child, Rosalind Margaret Hicks, died, also aged 85, on October 28, 2004 from natural causes in Torbay, Devon.[28] Christie’s grandson, Mathew Prichard, was heir to the copyright to some of his grandmother’s literary work (including The Mousetrap) and is still associated with Agatha Christie Limited.

Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple

Agatha Christie’s first novel The Mysterious Affair at Styles was published in 1920 and introduced the long-running character detective Hercule Poirot, who appeared in 33 of Christie’s novels and 54 short stories.

Her other well known character, Miss Marple, was introduced in The Tuesday Night Club in 1927 (short story) and was based on women like Christie’s grandmother and her “cronies”.[29]

During the Second World War, Christie wrote two novels, Curtain and Sleeping Murder, intended as the last cases of these two great detectives, Hercule Poirot and Jane Marple, respectively. Both books were sealed in a bank vault for over thirty years and were released for publication by Christie only at the end of her life, when she realised that she could not write any more novels. These publications came on the heels of the success of the film version of Murder on the Orient Express in 1974.

Like Sir Arthur Conan Doyle with Sherlock Holmes, Christie was to become increasingly tired of her detective Poirot. In fact, by the end of the 1930s, Christie confided to her diary that she was finding Poirot “insufferable,” and by the 1960s she felt that he was “an ego-centric creep.” However, unlike Conan Doyle, Christie resisted the temptation to kill her detective off while he was still popular. She saw herself as an entertainer whose job was to produce what the public liked, and the public liked Poirot.[30]

In contrast, Christie was fond of Miss Marple. However, it is interesting to note that the Belgian detective’s titles outnumber the Marple titles more than two to one. This is largely because Christie wrote numerous Poirot novels early in her career, while The Murder at the Vicarage remained the sole Marple novel until the 1940s.

Christie never wrote a novel or short story featuring both Poirot and Miss Marple. In a recording, recently rediscovered and released in 2008, Christie revealed the reason for this: “Hercule Poirot, a complete egoist, would not like being taught his business or having suggestions made to him by an elderly spinster lady”.[29]

Poirot is the only fictional character to have been given an obituary in The New York Times, following the publication of Curtain in 1975.

Following the great success of Curtain, Dame Agatha gave permission for the release of Sleeping Murder sometime in 1976 but died in January 1976 before the book could be released. This may explain some of the inconsistencies compared to the rest of the Marple series — for example, Colonel Arthur Bantry, husband of Miss Marple’s friend Dolly, is still alive and well in Sleeping Murder despite the fact he is noted as having died in books published earlier. It may be that Christie simply did not have time to revise the manuscript before she died. Miss Marple fared better than Poirot, since after solving the mystery in Sleeping Murder she returns home to her regular life in St. Mary Mead.

On an edition of Desert Island Discs in 2007, Brian Aldiss claimed that Agatha Christie told him that she wrote her books up to the last chapter and then decided who the most unlikely suspect was. She would then go back and make the necessary changes to “frame” that person.[31] The evidence of Christie’s working methods, as described by successive biographers, contradicts this claim.[citation needed]

Formula and plot devices

Almost all of Agatha Christie’s books are whodunits, focusing on the British middle and upper classes. Usually, the detective either stumbles across the murder or is called upon by an old acquaintance, who is somehow involved. Gradually, the detective interrogates each suspect, examines the scene of the crime and makes a note of each clue, so readers can analyze it and be allowed a fair chance of solving the mystery themselves. Then, about halfway through, or sometimes even during the final act, one of the suspects usually dies, often because they have inadvertently deduced the killer’s identity and need silencing. In a few of her novels, including Death Comes as the End and And Then There Were None, there are multiple victims. Finally, the detective organises a meeting of all the suspects and slowly denounces the guilty party, exposing several unrelated secrets along the way, sometimes over the course of thirty or so pages. The murders are often extremely ingenious, involving some convoluted piece of deception. Christie’s stories are also known for their taut atmosphere and strong psychological suspense, developed from the deliberately slow pace of her prose.

Twice, the murderer surprisingly turns out to be the unreliable narrator of the story.

In five stories, Christie allows the murderer to escape justice (and in the case of the last three, implicitly almost approves of their crimes); these are The Witness for the Prosecution, The Man in the Brown Suit, Murder on the Orient Express, Curtain and The Unexpected Guest. (When Christie adapted Witness into a stage play, she lengthened the ending so that the murderer was also killed.) There are also numerous instances where the killer is not brought to justice in the legal sense but instead dies (death usually being presented as a more ‘sympathetic’ outcome), for example Peril at End House, Death on the Nile, The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, Crooked House, Appointment with Death, The Hollow, and Secret Adversary. In some cases this is with the collusion of the detective involved. Five Little Pigs, and arguably Ordeal by Innocence, end with the question of whether formal justice will be done unresolved.

Critical reception

Agatha Christie was revered as a master of suspense, plotting, and characterisation by most of her contemporaries[says who?]. Fellow crime writer Anthony Berkeley Cox was an admitted fan of her work, once saying that nobody can write an Agatha Christie novel but the authoress herself.[citation needed]

However, she does have her detractors, most notably the American novelist Raymond Chandler, who criticised her in his essay, “The Simple Art of Murder“, and the American literary critic Edmund Wilson, who was dismissive of Christie and the detective fiction genre generally in his New Yorker essay, “Who Cares Who Killed Roger Ackroyd?”.[32]

Others have criticized Christie on political grounds, particularly with respect to her conversations about and portrayals of Jews. Christopher Hitchens, in his autobiography, describes a dinner with Christie and her husband, Professor Sir Max Mallowan, which became increasingly uncomfortable as the night wore on, and where “The anti-Jewish flavour of the talk was not to be ignored or overlooked, or put down to heavy humour or generational prejudice. It was vividly unpleasant…”[33] Twenty-five years after her death, critic Johann Hari notes “In its ugliest moments, Christie’s conservatism crossed over into a contempt for Jews, who are so often associated with rationalist political philosophies and a ‘cosmopolitanism’ that is antithetical to the Burkean paradigm of the English village. There is a streak of anti-Semitism running through the pre-1950s novels which cannot be denied even by her admirers.”[34]


Christie occasionally inserted stereotyped descriptions of characters into her work, particularly before the end of the Second World War (when such attitudes were more commonly expressed publicly), and particularly in regard to Italians, Jews, and non-Europeans. For example, in the first editions of the collection The Mysterious Mr Quin (1930), in the short story “The Soul of the Croupier,” she described “Hebraic men with hook-noses wearing rather flamboyant jewellery”; in later editions the passage was edited to describe “sallow men” wearing same. To contrast with the more stereotyped descriptions, Christie often characterised the “foreigners” in such a way as to make the reader understand and sympathise with them; this is particularly true of her Jewish characters, who are seldom actually criminals. (See, for example, the character of Oliver Manders in Three Act Tragedy.) [35]


Christie has been portrayed on a number of occasions in film and television.

Several biographical programs have been made, such as the 2004 BBC television programme entitled Agatha Christie: A Life in Pictures, in which she is portrayed by Olivia Williams, Anna Massey, and Bonnie Wright.

Christie has also been portrayed fictionally. Some of these have explored and offered accounts of Christie’s disappearance in 1926, including the 1979 film Agatha (with Vanessa Redgrave, where she sneaks away to plan revenge against her husband) and the Doctor Who episode “The Unicorn and the Wasp” (with Fenella Woolgar, her disappearance being the result of her suffering a temporary breakdown due to a brief psychic link being formed between her and an alien as well as time travel in the TARDIS). Others, such as 1980 Hungarian film, Kojak Budapesten (not to be confused with the 1986 comedy by the same name) create their own scenarios involving Christie’s criminal skill.[36] In the 1986 TV play, Murder by the Book, Christie herself (Dame Peggy Ashcroft) murdered one of her fictional-turned-real characters, Poirot. The heroine of Liar-Soft‘s 2008 visual novel Shikkoku no Sharnoth ~What a beautiful tomorrow~, Mary Clarissa Christie, is based on the real-life Christie. Christie features as a charcter in Gaylord Larsen’s Dorothy and Agatha and The London Blitz Murders’ by Max Allan Collins.[citation needed]

Christie has also been parodied on screen, such as in the film Murder by Indecision, which featured the character “Agatha Crispy”.

List of works


Title Detectives
1920 The Mysterious Affair at Styles Hercule Poirot
Arthur Hastings
Inspector Japp
1922 The Secret Adversary Tommy and Tuppence
Inspector Japp (mentioned)
1923 The Murder on the Links Hercule Poirot
Arthur Hastings
1924 The Man in the Brown Suit Anne Beddingfeld
Colonel Race
1925 The Secret of Chimneys Anthony Cade
Superintendent Battle
1926 The Murder of Roger Ackroyd Hercule Poirot
1927 The Big Four Hercule Poirot
Arthur Hastings
Chief Inspector Japp
1928 The Mystery of the Blue Train Hercule Poirot
1929 The Seven Dials Mystery Eileen “Bundle” Brent
Superintendent Battle
1930 The Murder at the Vicarage Miss Marple
1931 The Sittaford Mystery
also Murder at Hazelmoor
Emily Trefusis
Inspector Narracott
1932 Peril at End House Hercule Poirot
Arthur Hastings
Chief Inspector Japp
1933 Lord Edgware Dies
also Thirteen at Dinner
Hercule Poirot
Arthur Hastings
Chief Inspector Japp
1934 Murder on the Orient Express
also Murder in the Calais Coach
Hercule Poirot
1934 Why Didn’t They Ask Evans?
also The Boomerang Clue
Bobby Jones
Frankie Derwent
1935 Three Act Tragedy
also Murder in Three Acts
Hercule Poirot
Mr. Satterthwaite
1935 Death in the Clouds
also Death in the Air
Hercule Poirot
Chief Inspector Japp
1936 The A.B.C. Murders
also The Alphabet Murders
Hercule Poirot
Arthur Hastings
Chief Inspector Japp
1936 Murder in Mesopotamia Hercule Poirot
1936 Cards on the Table Hercule Poirot
Colonel Race
Superintendent Battle
Ariadne Oliver
1937 Dumb Witness
also Poirot Loses a Client
Hercule Poirot
Arthur Hastings
1937 Death on the Nile Hercule Poirot
Colonel Race
1938 Appointment with Death Hercule Poirot
1938 Hercule Poirot’s Christmas
also Murder for Christmas
also A Holiday for Murder
Hercule Poirot
1939 Murder is Easy
also Easy to Kill
Luke Fitzwilliam
Superintendent Battle
1939 Ten Little Niggers
also And Then There Were None
also Ten Little Indians
1940 Sad Cypress Hercule Poirot
1940 One, Two, Buckle My Shoe
also An Overdose of Death
also The Patriotic Murders
Hercule Poirot
Chief Inspector Japp
1941 Evil Under the Sun Hercule Poirot
1941 N or M? Tommy and Tuppence
1942 The Body in the Library Miss Marple
1942 Five Little Pigs
also Murder in Retrospect
Hercule Poirot
1942 The Moving Finger
also The Case of the Moving Finger
Miss Marple
1944 Towards Zero Superintendent Battle
Inspector James Leach
1944 Death Comes as the End Hori
1945 Sparkling Cyanide
also Remembered Death
Colonel Race
1946 The Hollow
also Murder After Hours
Hercule Poirot
1948 Taken at the Flood
also There is a Tide…
Hercule Poirot
1949 Crooked House Charles Hayward
1950 A Murder is Announced Miss Marple
1951 They Came to Baghdad Victoria Jones
1952 Mrs McGinty’s Dead
also Blood Will Tell
Hercule Poirot
Ariadne Oliver
1952 They Do It with Mirrors
also Murder with Mirrors
Miss Marple
1953 After the Funeral
also Funerals are Fatal
also Murder at the Gallop
Hercule Poirot
1953 A Pocket Full of Rye Miss Marple
1954 Destination Unknown
also So Many Steps to Death
1955 Hickory Dickory Dock
also Hickory Dickory Death
Hercule Poirot
1956 Dead Man’s Folly Hercule Poirot
Ariadne Oliver
1957 4.50 from Paddington
also What Mrs. McGillicuddy Saw!
also Murder She Said
Miss Marple
1958 Ordeal by Innocence  
1959 Cat Among the Pigeons Hercule Poirot
1961 The Pale Horse Inspector Lejeune
Ariadne Oliver
1962 The Mirror Crack’d from Side to Side
also The Mirror Crack’d
Miss Marple
1963 The Clocks Hercule Poirot
1964 A Caribbean Mystery Miss Marple
1965 At Bertram’s Hotel Miss Marple
1966 Third Girl Hercule Poirot
Ariadne Oliver
1967 Endless Night  
1968 By the Pricking of My Thumbs Tommy and Tuppence
1969 Hallowe’en Party Hercule Poirot
Ariadne Oliver
1970 Passenger to Frankfurt  
1971 Nemesis Miss Marple
1972 Elephants Can Remember Hercule Poirot
Ariadne Oliver
1973 Postern of Fate
final Tommy and Tuppence
last novel Christie wrote
Tommy and Tuppence
1975 Curtain
Poirot’s last case, written four decades earlier
Hercule Poirot
Arthur Hastings
1976 Sleeping Murder
Miss Marple’s last case, written four decades earlier
Miss Marple

Collections of short stories

In addition to her novels Christie wrote and published 160 short stories in her career. Almost all of these were written for publication in fiction magazines with over half of them first appearing in the 1920s. They were then published in book form in various collections, some of which were identical in the UK and US (e.g., The Labours of Hercules) and others where publication took place in one market but not the other.

Twelve of the stories which were published in The Sketch magazine in 1924 under the sub-heading of The Man who was No. 4 were further joined into one continuous narrative in the novel The Big Four in 1927. Four further stories, The Submarine Plans (1923), Christmas Adventure (1923), The Mystery of the Baghdad Chest (1932) and The Second Gong (1932), were expanded into longer narratives by Christie (respectively The Incredible Theft, The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding, The Mystery of the Spanish Chest and Dead Man’s Mirror although the shorter versions of all four have also been published in the UK).

Only one short story remains unpublished in the UK in book form: Three Blind Mice (1948), on which Christie placed a moratorium whilst the stage play based on the story, The Mousetrap, was still running in the West End. Prior to this the story was published in four installments in the weekly magazine Woman’s Own in the issues dated December 31, 1948 to January 21, 1949 with illustrations by K. J. Petts.

In the US, the story Christmas Adventure has not been published in book form.

The main collections in both markets are:

In addition, various collections have been published over the years which re-print short stories which have previously appeared in other collections e.g. Surprise, Surprise! (1965 in the US). On occasion, in among the reprinted material, these collections have sometimes contained the first book printing of an individual story e.g. The Market Basing Mystery in the UK version of Thirteen for Luck! (1966) which later appeared in the same market in Poirot’s Early Cases.

Novels written as Mary Westmacott


Radio Plays

Television Plays


Other published works

Co-authored works

Works by Agatha Christie
Detectives Hercule Poirot · Miss Marple · Colonel Race · Tommy and Tuppence · Ariadne Oliver · Arthur Hastings · Superintendent Battle · Chief Inspector Japp · Parker Pyne · Mr. Harley Quin
Novels The Mysterious Affair at Styles · The Secret Adversary · The Murder on the Links · The Man in the Brown Suit · The Secret of Chimneys · The Murder of Roger Ackroyd · The Big Four · The Mystery of the Blue Train · The Seven Dials Mystery · The Murder at the Vicarage · The Sittaford Mystery · Peril at End House · Lord Edgware Dies · Murder on the Orient Express · Why Didn’t They Ask Evans? · Three Act Tragedy · Death in the Clouds · The A.B.C. Murders · Murder in Mesopotamia · Cards on the Table · Dumb Witness · Death on the Nile · Appointment with Death · Hercule Poirot’s Christmas · Murder Is Easy · And Then There Were None · Sad Cypress · One, Two, Buckle My Shoe · Evil Under the Sun · N or M? · The Body in the Library · Five Little Pigs · The Moving Finger · Towards Zero · Death Comes as the End · Sparkling Cyanide · The Hollow · Taken at the Flood · Crooked House · A Murder is Announced · They Came to Baghdad · Mrs McGinty’s Dead · They Do It with Mirrors · After the Funeral · A Pocket Full of Rye · Destination Unknown · Hickory Dickory Dock · Dead Man’s Folly · 4.50 from Paddington · Ordeal by Innocence · Cat Among the Pigeons · The Pale Horse · The Mirror Crack’d from Side to Side · The Clocks · A Caribbean Mystery · At Bertram’s Hotel · Third Girl · Endless Night · By the Pricking of My Thumbs · Hallowe’en Party · Passenger to Frankfurt · Nemesis · Elephants Can Remember · Postern of Fate · Curtain · Sleeping Murder
As Mary
Giant’s Bread · Unfinished Portrait · Absent in the Spring · The Rose and the Yew Tree · A Daughter’s a Daughter · The Burden
Short story
Poirot Investigates · Partners in Crime · The Mysterious Mr. Quin · The Thirteen Problems · The Hound of Death · The Listerdale Mystery · Parker Pyne Investigates · Murder in the Mews · The Regatta Mystery · The Labours of Hercules · The Witness for the Prosecution and Other Stories · Three Blind Mice and Other Stories · The Under Dog and Other Stories · The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding · Double Sin and Other Stories · The Golden Ball and Other Stories · Poirot’s Early Cases · Miss Marple’s Final Cases and Two Other Stories · Problem at Pollensa Bay and Other Stories · The Harlequin Tea Set · While the Light Lasts and Other Stories
Plays Black Coffee · And Then There Were None · Appointment with Death · Murder on the Nile/Hidden Horizon · The Hollow · The Mousetrap · Witness for the Prosecution · Spider’s Web · A Daughter’s a Daughter · Towards Zero · Verdict · The Unexpected Guest · Go Back for Murder · Rule of Three · Fiddlers Three · Akhnaton · Chimneys
Radio and
television plays
Wasp’s Nest · The Yellow Iris · Three Blind Mice · Butter In a Lordly Dish · Personal Call
Other books The Road of Dreams · Come, Tell Me How You Live · Star Over Bethlehem and other stories · Poems · An Autobiography


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