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WEBSITE OF THE WEEK : INDIAN HISTORY

WEBSITE OF THE WEEK

APRIL IV WEEK, 2011

http://www.indhistory.com/

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AUTHOR OF THE WEEK : HARIVANSH RAI BACHCHAN

AUTHOR OF THE WEEK

APRIL IV WEEK, 2011

Harivansh Rai Bachchan


Harivansh Bachchan

Born November 27, 1907
Allahabad, Uttar Pradesh
Died January 18, 2003(2003-01-18) (aged 95)
Mumbai, India
Occupation Poet
Spouse(s) Shyama (1926 – 1936), Teji Bachchan (1941 – 2003 his death)

Harivansh Rai “Bachchan” Shrivastav (November 27, 1907– January 18, 2003) was a distinguished Hindi poet of Chhayavaad literary movement (romantic upsurge) of early 20th century Hindi literature. He was also a famous poet of Hindi Kavi Sammelan. He is best known for his early work Madhushala (मधुशाला).[1] He is also the father of Bollywood megastar, Amitabh Bachchan.

Personal life and education

Born in a Srivastava Kayastha family, in the village of Babupatti (Raniganj) in the district of Pratapgarh, U.P. near Allahabad in the United Provinces (modern Uttar Pradesh). He was the eldest son of Pratap Narayan Shrivastav and Saraswati Devi. He was called bachchan (meaning ‘child-like’) at home. He received his formal schooling in a municipal school and followed the family tradition of attending Kayastha Paathshaalas (कायस्थ पाठशाला) to learn Urdu as the first step to a career in law. He later studied at the Allahabad University and Banaras Hindu University. In this period, he came under the influence of the independence movement, then under the leadership of Mahatma Gandhi.

Realizing that this was not the path he wanted to follow, he went back to the university. However from 1941 to 1952 he taught in the English Department at the Allahabad University and after that he spent the next two years at Cambridge University doing his doctoral thesis on W.B. Yeats. It was then, that he used ‘Bachchan’ as his last name instead of Srivastava. Harivanshrai’s thesis got him his PhD at Cambridge. He is the second Indian to get his doctorate in English literature from Cambridge. After returning to India he again took to teaching and also served at All India Radio, Allahabad.

In 1926, at the age of 19, Bachchan married his first wife, Shyama, who was then 14 years old. However she died ten years later in 1936 after a long spell of TB at just 24 years of age. Bachchan again married, Teji Bachchan, in 1941. They had two sons, Amitabh and Ajitabh.

In 1955, Harivanshrai shifted to Delhi to join the External Affairs Ministry as an officer on Special duty and during the period of 10 years that he served he was also associated with the evolution of Hindi as the official language. He also enriched Hindi through his translations of major writings. As a poet is famous for his poem Madhushala (a bar selling alcoholic drinks). Besides Omar Khayyam’s Rubaiyat, he will also be remembered for his Hindi translations of Shakespeare’s Macbeth and Othello and also the Bhagvad Gita. However in Nov 1984 he wrote his last poem ‘Ek November1984’ on Indira Gandhi’s assassination.

Harivanshrai was nominated to the Indian Rajya Sabha in 1966 and received the Sahitya Akademi award three years later. In 1976 he was honoured with the Padma Bhushan for his immense contribution to Hindi literature. He was also honoured with the Saraswati Samman, the Sovietland Nehru Award and the Lotus Award of the Afro-Asian writers’ conference, for his unique contribution to the world of letters. But if ever asked to introduce himself, he had a simple introduction: Mitti ka tan, masti ka man, kshan-bhar jivan — mera parichay. (A body of clay, a mind full of play, a moment’s life – that is me.).

Bachchan died on January 18, 2003, at the age of 95, as a result of various respiratory ailments.[2] His wife Teji Bachchan died four years later in 2007, at the age of 93.

Career

Teaching career

From 1941 to 1952 he taught English Literature at Allahabad University and then spent two years at Cambridge University, at St Catharine’s College. There he studied with the famous English literature don, Thomas Rice Henn, and received a doctorate in English Literature for his work on the Irish poet W.B. Yeats and Occultism. It was there that he used Bachchan as his last name instead of ‘srivastava. He was the second Indian to get his doctorate in English literature from Cambridge University.

After returning to India, he taught briefly and then worked as a producer for All India Radio,mumbai In 1955, he moved to Delhi to join the Ministry of External Affairs of the Government of India and there he was closely involved with the evolution of Hindi as the official language of India.

Popular culture

One of his inspirational poems, Agneepath (“Path of fire”), was used as the theme (and its title as the title) for the 1991 blockbuster movie featuring his actor son Amitabh Bachchan, as a ruthless mafia don. This movie was a failure commercially but earned Amitabh Bachchan a National Award for his performance. You can see Amitabh narrating the poem through out the movie.

The poem describes the entire gamut of sufferings that the human race had gone through and is going through.

Awards and honors

Bachchan was nominated to the Rajya Sabha, the Upper House of the Indian Parliament in 1966, and received the Sahitya Academy Award in 1969. In 1976, he was honoured with the Padma Bhushan and the Saraswati Samman for his contribution to Hindi literature. In 1994, he was conferred with the “Yash Bharati” Samman by the Government of Uttar Pradesh. [1] He is a recipient of the Soviet Land Nehru Award and the Lotus Award of the Afro-Asian writers conference.

In 2003, an Indian postage stamp was released in his memory.

List of works

Poems

  • Madhushala (1935)
  • Madhubala (मधुबाला) (1936)
  • Madhukalash (मधुकलश) (1937)
  • Nisha Nimantran (निशा निमंत्रण) (1938)
  • Ekaant Sangeet (एकांत संगीत) (1939)
  • Aakul Antar (आकुल अंतर) (1943)
  • Satarangini (सतरंगिनी) (1945)
  • Halaahal (हलाहल) (1946)
  • Bengal ka Kaavya (बंगाल का काव्य) (1946)
  • Kaadi ke Phool (खादी के फूल) (1948)
  • Soot ki Maala (सूत की माला) (1948)
  • Milan Yamini (मिलन यामिनी) (1950)
  • Pranay Patrika (प्रणय पत्रिका) (1955)
  • Dhaar ke idhar udhar (धार के इधर उधर) (1957)
  • Aarti aur Angaare (आरती और अंगारे) (1958)
  • Buddha aur Naachghar (बुद्ध और नाचघर) (1958)
  • Tribhangima (त्रिभंगिमा) (1961)
  • Chaar kheme Chaunsath khoonte (चार खेमे चौंसठ खूंटे) (1962)
  • Do Chattane (दो चट्टानें) (1965)
  • Bahut din beete (बहुत दिन बीते) (1967)
  • Kat-ti pratimaaon ki awaaz (कटती प्रतिमाओं की आवाज़) (1968)
  • Ubharte pratimaano ke roop (उभरते प्रतिमानों के रूप) (1969)
  • Jaal sameta (जाल समेटा) (1973)
  • Nirman
MiscellaneousBachpan ke saath kshan bhar (बचपन के साथ क्षण भर) (1934)

  • Khaiyyam ki madhushala (खय्याम की मधुशाला) (1938)
  • Sopaan (सोपान) (1953)
  • Mcbeth (1957)
  • Jangeet (जनगीता) (1958)
  • Othello (1959)
  • Omar Khaiyyam ki rubaaiyan (उमर खय्याम की रुबाइयाँ) (1959)
  • Kaviyon ke saumya sant: Pant (कवियों के सौम्य संत: पंत) (1960)
  • Aaj ke lokpriya Hindi kavi: Sumitranandan Pant (आज के लोकप्रिय हिन्दी कवि: सुमित्रानंदन पंत) (1960)
  • Aadhunik kavi: 7 (आधुनिक कवि: ७) (1961)
  • Nehru: Raajnaitik jeevanchitra (नेहरू: राजनैतिक जीवनचित्र) (1961)
  • Naye puraane jharokhe (नये पुराने झरोखे) (1962)
  • Abhinav sopaan (अभिनव सोपान) (1964)
  • Chausath roosi kavitaayein (चौसठ रूसी कवितायें) (1964)
  • W.B. Yeats and Occultism (1968)
  • Markat dweep ka swar (मरकट द्वीप का स्वर) (1968)
  • Naagar geet (नागर गीत) (1966)
  • Bachpan ke lokpriya geet (बचपन के लोकप्रिय गीत) (1967)
  • Hamlet (1969)
  • Bhaasha apni bhaav paraaye (भाषा अपनी भाव पराये) (1970)
  • Pant ke sau patra (पंत के सौ पत्र) (1970)
  • Pravaas ki diary (प्रवास की डायरी) (1971)
  • King Lear (1972)
  • Tooti Chooti kadiyan (टूटी छूटी कड़ियां) (1973)
  • Meri kavitaayi ki aadhi sadi (मेरी कविताई की आधी सदी) (1981)
  • So-ham hans (सोहं हंस) (1981)
  • Aathve dashak ki pratinidhi shreshth kavitaayein (आठवें दशक की प्रतिनिधी श्रेष्ठ कवितायें) (1982)
  • Meri shreshth kavitaayein (मेरी श्रेष्ठ कवितायें) (1984)
  • Jo beet gai so Bat gai

Harivanshrai Bachchan Biography

Harivanshrai Srivastav (November 27, 1907 – January 18, 2003) was a Hindi poet.

He born in an ordinary Kayasth family in a small town near Allahabad. He was called “bachchan” at home, which means “child.” He received his formal schooling in a municipal school and attended Kayasth Paathshaalas to learn Urdu, which was the family tradition so as to help getting jobs in court. He completed his later education both at the Allahabad University and Banaras Hindu University. Since he gave up his university education to participate in the great upsurge of nationalism that began in 1930.

Realizing that this was not the path he wanted to follow, he went back to university. However from 1941 to 1952 he taught in the English Department at the Allahabad University and after that he spent the next two years at Cambridge University doing his doctoral thesis on W.B. Yeats. It was then, that he used ‘Bachchan’ as his last name instead of Srivasta. Harivanshrai’s thesis got him his PhD at Cambridge. He however is the second Indian to get his doctorate in English literature from Cambridge. After returning to India he again took to teaching and also served at All India Radio, Allahabad.

In 1955, Harivanshrai shifted to Delhi to join the External Affairs Ministry as an officer on Special duty and during the period of 10 years that he served he was also associated with the evolution of Hindi as the official language. He also enriched Hindi through his translations of major writings. As a poet is famous for his poem Madhushala (a bar selling alcoholic drinks). Besides Omar Khayyam’s Rubaiyat, he will also be remembered for his Hindi translations of Shakespeare’s Macbeth and Othello and also the Bhagvad Gita. However in Nov 1984 he wrote his last poem ‘Ek November1984’ on Indira Gandhi’s assassination.

He got married to Shyama his first wife in 1926. She was just 14 yrs old. But she died 10 yrs later after suffering from a long spell of TB. Shortly after her death Harivanshrai married Teji Suri in 1942. The birth of his two sons Amitabh and Ajitabh changed the course of his life as his days of hardship ended when both his sons did extremely well in their careers – Amitabh became a superstar and a multi billionaire and Ajitab turned out to be a successful business magnate in England.

Harivanshrai was nominated to the Indian Rajya Sabha in 1966 and received the Sahitya Akademi award three years later. In 1976 he was honoured with the Padma Bhushan for his immense contribution to Hindi literature. He was also honoured with the Saraswati Samman, the Sovietland Nehru Award and the Lotus Award of the Afro-Asian writers’ conference, for his unique contribution to the world of letters. But if ever asked to introduce himself, he had a simple introduction: Mitti ka tan, masti ka man, kshan-bhar jivan — mera parichay. (A body of clay, a mind full of play, a moment’s life – that is me.).

Dr. Harivanshrai Bachchan’ passed away on January 18, 2003, Dr Bachchan was 94 years old and had been suffering from serious respiratory ailments.

Filed under: Author of the Week, , ,

QUOTES OF THE WEEK – THINKING

QUOTES OF THE WEEK

APRIL IV WEEK, 2011

Quotations about Thinking

 

No problem can withstand the assault of sustained thinking.  ~Voltaire

Reading without reflecting is like eating without digesting.  ~Edmund Burke

Often the hands will solve a mystery that the intellect has struggled with in vain.  ~Carl G. Jung

Never be afraid to sit awhile and think.  ~Lorraine Hansberry, A Raisin in the Sun

No matter where you go or what you do, you live your entire life within the confines of your head.  ~Terry Josephson

You and I are not what we eat; we are what we think.  ~Walter Anderson, The Confidence Course, 1997

Did you ever stop to think, and forget to start again?  ~Winnie the Pooh

People demand freedom of speech as a compensation for the freedom of thought which they seldom use.  ~Soren Kierkegaard

Too often we… enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought.  ~John F. Kennedy

The trouble with most people is that they think with their hopes or fears or wishes rather than with their minds.  ~Will Durant

Begin challenging your own assumptions.  Your assumptions are your windows on the world.  Scrub them off every once in awhile, or the light won’t come in.  ~Alan Alda

I like to think of thoughts as living blossoms borne by the human tree.  ~James Douglas

The forceps of our minds are clumsy things and crush the truth a little in the course of taking hold of it.  ~H.G. Wells

Our minds are lazier than our bodies.  ~François, Duc de La Rochefoucauld, Maxims, 1678

Invest a few moments in thinking.  It will pay good interest.  ~Author Unknown

Some people get lost in thought because it’s such unfamiliar territory.  ~G. Behn

Thinking is like loving and dying.  Each of us must do it for himself.  ~Josiah Royce

It is well for people who think, to change their minds occasionally in order to keep them clean.  ~Luther Burbank

Physiological response to thinking and to pain is the same; and man is not given to hurting himself.  ~Martin H. Fischer

We spend our days in deliberating, and we end them without coming to any resolve.  ~L’Estrange

Our job is not to make up anybody’s mind, but to open minds and to make the agony of the decision-making so intense you can escape only by thinking.  ~Author Unknown

Thinking in its lower grades is comparable to paper money, and in its higher forms it is a kind of poetry.  ~Havelock Ellis, The Dance of Life, 1923

The average man never really thinks from end to end of his life.  The mental activity of such people is only a mouthing of clichés.  ~H.L. Mencken, Prejudices, 1925

Few people think more than two or three times a year; I have made an international reputation for myself by thinking once a week.  ~George Bernard Shaw

…the thoughtful excitement of lonely rambles, of gardening, and of other like occupations, where the mind has leisure to must during the healthful activity of the body, with the fresh and wakeful breezes blowing round it…  ~Augustus William Hare and Julius Charles Hare, Guesses at Truth, by Two Brothers, 1827

Belief is when someone else does the thinking.  ~Buckminster Fuller, 1972

Irons rusts from disuse, stagnant water loses its purity and in cold weather becomes frozen; even so does inaction sap the vigor of the mind.  ~Leonardo da Vinci, Notebooks, 1508

A sect or party is an elegant incognito devised to save a man from the vexation of thinking.  ~Ralph Waldo Emerson

Thoughts, like fleas, jump from man to man.  But they don’t bite everybody.  ~Stanislaw Lec, Unkempt Thoughts, 1962

Nothing is more conducive to peace of mind than not having any opinion at all.  ~G.C. Lichtenberg

The world we have created is a product of our thinking; it cannot be changed without changing our thinking.  ~Albert Einstein

Brain, n.  An apparatus with which we think that we think.  ~Ambrose Bierce, The Devil’s Dictionary

At a certain age some people’s minds close up; they live on their intellectual fat.  ~William Lyon Phelps

Thought is the wind, knowledge the sail, and mankind the vessel.  ~Augustus William Hare and Julius Charles Hare, Guesses at Truth, by Two Brothers, 1827

No amount of energy will take the place of thought.  A strenuous life with its eyes shut is a kind of wild insanity.  ~Henry Van Dyke

Tell your friends not to think aloud
Until they swallow.
~Nickelback, “Leader of Men,” The State

Believing is easier than thinking.  Hence so many more believers than thinkers.  ~Bruce Calvert

A man is not idle because he is absorbed in thought.  There is a visible labor and there is an invisible labor  ~Victor Hugo

Sometimes I think and other times I am.  ~Paul Valéry, Variété: Cantiques spirituels, 1924

Few minds wear out; more rust out.  ~Christian N. Bovee

Opinion is that exercise of the human will which helps us to make a decision without information.  ~John Erskine

Some people do not become thinkers simply because their memories are too good.  ~Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche

Men can live without air a few minutes, without water for about two weeks, without food for about two months – and without a new thought for years on end.  ~Kent Ruth

The thoughts that come often unsought, and, as it were, drop into the mind, are commonly the most valuable of any we have.  ~John Locke, 16 May 1699

Men who borrow their opinions can never repay their debts.  ~George Savile, Marquess de Halifax, Miscellaneous Thoughts and Reflections

A lawyer’s brief will be brief, before a freethinker thinks freely.  ~Augustus William Hare and Julius Charles Hare, Guesses at Truth, by Two Brothers, 1827

Chi Wen Tzu always thought three times before taking action.  Twice would have been quite enough.  ~Confucius, Analects

Impartial observers from other planets would consider ours an utterly bizarre enclave if it were populated by birds, defined as flying animals, that nevertheless rarely or never actually flew.  They would also be perplexed if they encountered in our seas, lakes, rivers, and ponds, creatures defined as swimmers that never did any swimming.  But they would be even more surprised to encounter a species defined as a thinking animal if, in fact, the creature very rarely indulged in actual thinking.  ~Steve Allen

What luck for rulers, that men do not think.  ~Adolph Hitler

Doubt is not a pleasant state of mind, but certainty is absurd.  ~Voltaire, 1767

Men fear thought as they fear nothing else on earth, more than ruin, more even than death.  Thought is subversive and revolutionary, destructive and terrible, thought is merciless to privilege, established institutions, and comfortable habit.  Thought looks into the pit of hell and is not afraid.  Thought is great and swift and free, the light of the world, and the chief glory of man.  ~Bertrand Russell

[Thinking is] what a great many people think they are doing when they are merely rearranging their prejudices.  ~William James

For those who do not think, it is best at least to rearrange their prejudices once in a while.  ~Luther Burbank

How wonderful that we have met with a paradox.  Now we have some hope of making progress.  ~Niels Bohr

You cannot plough a field by turning it over in your mind.  ~Author Unknown

He who will not reason is a bigot; he who cannot is a fool; and he who dares not is a slave.  ~William Drummond, Academical Questions

Ours is the age which is proud of machines that think and suspicious of men who try to.  ~Howard Mumford Jones

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ARTICLE OF THE WEEK : HOW TO BE HAPPY

ARTICLE OF THE WEEK

APRIL IV WEEK, 2011

How to be Happy – 7 Secrets for a Happy Life


– Jonathan Lockwood Huie

We all want to be happy, but something always gets in the way. There is never enough time… or money. Somebody is always failing to do what they are “supposed” to do… or not do. Our boss, our spouse, our kids, our parents, our friends, government, big business, whoever… “They” aren’t doing it right. “They” failed us. We are angry, and we have a right to be angry. But is that righteous anger making us happy?

Happiness is not something anyone else can give us… or take away from us. Happiness is what we make of our lives… or don’t. Whatever our circumstances, we can create a joyful life… or a miserable life. It is up to us.

Here are 7 Secrets for a Happy Life

1. Respect Yourself: If I don’t love and respect myself, who will? It all starts right here with ME. If I think that I’m a pretty good person, it doesn’t much matter what anyone else thinks. And the irony is that once I like myself, most everyone else will like me too. People enjoy being around people who speak well of themselves – not in an arrogant boastful way, but with honest self-appreciation.

2. Forgive Everyone for Everything: Angry and happy don’t mix. Flush out the angry, and the happy has a place to put down roots. Until we forgive everyone for everything, we hold on to anger and resentment. Once we forgive, we can become happy. Forgiving is not a gift to someone else – Forgiving is our gift to ourselves – a great gift – the gift of happiness.

3. Be Grateful for All of Life: Each of us has been infinitely blessed – beginning with the gift of life. Whatever may appear to be missing or broken on any particular day, our glass is not half full, it is 99.9% full. More practically, when we feel ungrateful, we become unhappy. When we choose to feel and express our gratitude, the act of feeling and speaking our thanks creates a happiness within us. The more we express our gratitude, the more we have for which to be grateful. Today and every day, take time to celebrate life – whether an hour’s meditation in a quiet natural space, or a brief moment’s conscious pause to breathe deeply and celebrate gratitude for life.

4. Choose Happiness: Everything in life is a choice. There is never anything we ever “need” to do. Every action and thought is a choice and has consequences – pleasant or unpleasant. Whether you go to work today, change jobs, smile at the bank teller, yell at your kids, complain about life, hold a daily celebration of gratitude for life – they are all choices. Happiness is a choice. Stay alert and make conscious choices for happiness.

5. Begin at the End: You can never reach your destination if you don’t have a destination. Decide what accomplishments you want recorded on your tombstone. Take a whole quiet day to consider your life. Be very clear that your happiness does NOT depend on reaching your goal. In fact, it’s the reverse. Your happiness depends on accepting whatever life throws at you while you walk the path toward your goal. What is important for your happiness is having a goal, and working toward it.

6. Start Today: Whatever you want in life, start today. Not tomorrow – today. Let it be a small beginning – a tiny beginning. Your happiness depends on starting today – every day.

7. Accept that Life is NOT “Supposed to be Fair”: Know that there is no single way that life is “supposed” to be. Demanding that life meet our expectations is a sure fire recipe for a miserable existence. Life is a game with no rules. Life just happens to us regardless of our best intentions. Our only path to happiness lies in being open to receiving whatever life throws at us – with Gratitude. Have NO Expectations of life.

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E-BOOKS ON ENGLISH GRAMMAR

E-BOOKS OF THE WEEK

APRIL III WEEK, 2011

FREE E-BOOKS ON ENGLISH GRAMMAR

1.A short system of english grammar

2,the grammar of english grammars

3,AN ENGLISH GRAMMAR

4.word study and grammar

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