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National Science Day, Feb.28, 2013

National Science Day, Feb.28, 2013

sircvraman
Rashtriya Vigyan Evam Prodoyogiki Sanchar Parishad (RVPSP) (National Council for Science & Technology Communication) of the Ministry of Science and Technology celebrates National Science day (NSD) to popularise the benefits of scientific knowledge and pratical appropriation.

Various activities are organized on the day like debates, quiz competitions, exhibitions, lectures, etc., in which college students, school students and teachers too participate.

Every year a different theme is selected and all the forth programmes and activities are based around that theme.

The day is celebrated to honour Nobel laureate Sir C.V. Raman for his invention of the ‘Raman effect’ on 28th February 1928.

Whole nation takes the honour of thanking all the scientists for their remarkable contributions and dedication on this occasion.

The day attracts many young minds and motivates to take up science as their career.

The celebrations of this day include showcasing the country’s competence in the field of science.

Science has played very important role in transforming society. The events on this day reminds the importance of science; thus inspire people of all ages to work in the field of science, engineering and technology.

Sir C. V. Raman was honoured with the first prestigious Nobel Award in Physics for the country in 1930. Hence the National Science Day holds great significance for Indian Science and scientific community.

National Science Day brings an opportunity to focus on issues related to science centre stage. The activities organized on the occasion bring public face to face with the issues of great concern. People interact with the science fraternity for mutual benefit.

National Science Day is observed to spread the message of importance of science and its application among the people and to accelerate the pace of development. Science has contributed a lot towards welfare of humanity.

Raman Effect

Raman effect or Raman scattering as it is popular known as is an inelastic scattering of a photon.

When light is scattered from an atom or molecule, most photons are elastically scattered with almost the same energy (frequency) and wavelength as the incident photons. But a small fraction of the photons is scattered by excitation. The frequency of scattered photons is lower than the frequency of the incident photons.

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National Mathematical Year 2012

National Mathematics Year

In India and in Nigeria the year 2012 CE is celebrated and observed as the National Mathematics Year. In India the National Mathematics Year is celebrated as a tribute to the mathematical genius Srinivasa Ramanujan who was born on 22 December 1887 and whose 125th birthday falls on 22 December 2012. In Nigeria, the year 2012 is observed as National Mathematics Year as part of the Federal Government’s effort to promote and popularise the study of mathematics.

National Mathematics Year in India

The decision to designate the year 2012 CE as National Mathematics Year was announced by Dr Manmohan Singh, Prime Minister of India, during the inaugural ceremony of the celebrations to mark the 125th birth anniversary of Srinivasa Ramanujan held at the Madras University Centenary Auditorium on 26 February 2012. The Prime Minister also announced that December 22 would be celebrated as National Mathematics Day from 2012 on.

An Organising Committee with Professor M.S. Raghunathan, President of the Ramanujan Mathematical Society as chair, and Professor Dinesh Singh, Secretary of the Ramanujan Mathematical Society as secretary, has been formed to formulate and implement programmes and projects as part of the observance of the National Mathematics Year. A National Committee with Minister for Human Resource Development Kapil Sibal as the chair supervises the activities of the Organising Committee

Prime Minister Manmohan Singh has declared the year 2012 as the ‘national year of mathematics’ for the country. This is to pay a tribute and mark the birth anniversary of mathematical genius Srinivasa Ramanujan.

In his address, the PM stressed that the country requires an adequate number of competent mathematicians in the 21century. Also, he said, the mathematical community has a duty to find out ways to address the shortage of quality mathematicians and reach out to the public, especially in the modern context, where mathematics has tremendous influence on every kind of human endeavour.

The great mathematician, Ramanujan , came from an economically weak background in Tamil Nadu and had minimal training in mathematics. Till few years of his initial childhood , he could not even speak, read or write. Yet he overcame all the formidable difficulties and contributed some of the greatest theories of maths.

His birthday, December 22, has been declared as the ‘national mathematics day’ . Celebrating the spirit of the maths genius, Dinesh Singh, vicechancellor , Delhi University, who has been a maths faculty, delivered a lecture at the Indian National Science Academy (INSA) recently. He elaborated on the history of India from the Indus Valley civilisation to S Ramanujan and the journey of mathematics.

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Vigilance Awareness Week, 2012

VIGILANCE AWARENESS WEEK, 2012

The Central Vigilance Commission, which has a special responsibility under para 3(v) of Government of India Resolution no 371/20/99/AVD-III dated 4.4.1999, declared that the week beginning from 31st October every year should be observed as the Vigilance Awareness Week.

The Vigilance Awareness Week has been decided to be observed keeping in view the spirit of the eminent leaders like Sardar Patel and the need for fighting the social evil of corruption.

The significance of 31st October is that it is the birthday of the Bismarck of India, Sardar Vallabh Bhai Patel. He represents the best values in the Indian tradition so far as governance is concerned. He integrated the country and also was a shinning example of probity in public life. Sardar Vallabh Bhai Patel exercised a major influence in establishing the administrative structure in India.

 Vigilance Awareness week from 29/10/12 to 3/11/12.

The theme of this year’s Vigilance Awareness Week is “Transparency in Public Procurement”.

MESSAGE FROM CENTRAL VIGILANCE COMMISSION

Message of Central Vigilance Commssion on Vigilance Awareness Week 2012

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Tamil New Year (13/4/2012)

Puthandu
Puthandu or better known as Tamil New Year or Chithirai Tiru-naal, is the celebration of the first day of the Tamil new year in mid-April by Tamils in Tamil Nadu, in Pondicherry in India, in Sri Lanka and by the Tamil population in Malaysia, Singapore, Reunion Island and Mauritius. On this day, Tamil people greet each other by saying “Puthandu Vazthukal” or “Iniya Tamizh Puthandu Nalvaazhthukkal” The festive occasion is in keeping with the Hindu solar calendar.
Origin and significance
The Tamil New Year follows the Nirayanam vernal equinox and generally falls either on 13 or 14 April of the Gregorian year. 13 or 14 April marks the first day of the traditional Tamil calendar and is a public holiday in both Tamil Nadu and Sri Lanka. Tropical vernal equinox fall around 22 March, and adding 23 degrees of trepidation or oscillation to it, we get the Hindu sidereal or Nirayana Mesha Sankranti (Sun’s transition into Nirayana Aries).
Hence, the Tamil calendar begins on the same date observed by most traditional calendars in India as in Assam, Bengal, Kerala, Manipur, Mithila, Orissa, Punjab, Tripura etc. not to mention Nepal, Bangladesh, Burma, Cambodia, Laos, Sri Lanka and Thailand. The 60-year cycle is ancient and is observed by most traditional calendars of India and China, and is related to 5 revolutions of Jupiter, or to 60-year orbit of Nakshatras (stars) as described in the Surya Siddhanta.
The traditional Tamil year starts on 13 April 2012, Kaliyuga 5114. Vikrama and Shalivahana Saka eras are also used. There are several references in early Tamil literature to the April new year. Nakkirar, the author of the Nedunalvaadai writes in the 3rd century that the Sun travels from Mesha/Chitterai through 11 successive Raasis or signs of the zodiac.[2] Kūdalūr Kizhaar in the 3rd century refers to Mesha Raasi/Chitterai as the commencement of the year in the Puranaanooru. The Tolkaapiyam is the oldest surviving Tamil grammar that divides the year into six seasons where Chitterai marks the start of the Ilavenil season or summer. The 8th century Silappadikaaram mentions the 12 Raasis or zodiac signs starting with Mesha/Chitterai. The Manimekalai alludes to the Hindu solar calendar as we know it today. Adiyarkunalaar, an early medieval commentator or Urai-asiriyar mentions the 12 months of the Tamil calendar with particular reference to Chitterai. There were subsequent inscriptional references in Pagan, Burma dated to the 11th century CE and in Sukhothai, Thailand dated to the 14th century CE to South Indian, often Vaishnavite, courtiers who were tasked with defining the traditional calendar that began in mid-April.
Celebration
Tamil people celebrate Tamil new year either on 13 or 14 April. Every year in the month of Chitterai (the first month of the Tamil solar calendar in April), in the temple city of Madurai, the Chitterai Thiruvizha is celebrated in the Meenakshi Temple. A huge exhibition is held, called Chitterai Porutkaatchi. In some parts of Southern Tamil Nadu, it is called Chitterai Vishu. The day is marked with a feast in Tamil homes and entrances to the houses are decorated elaborately with kolams. In most parts of India, one can see neem trees blooming with their flowers and the first batch of mangoes hanging prominently. This day is celebrated by some communities with neem flowers and raw mangoes to symbolize growth and prosperity.
Puthandu
Puthandu or better known as Tamil New Year or Chithirai Tiru-naal, is the celebration of the first day of the Tamil new year in mid-April by Tamils in Tamil Nadu, in Pondicherry in India, in Sri Lanka and by the Tamil population in Malaysia, Singapore, Reunion Island and Mauritius. On this day, Tamil people greet each other by saying “Puthandu Vazthukal” or “Iniya Tamizh Puthandu Nalvaazhthukkal” The festive occasion is in keeping with the Hindu solar calendar.
Origin and significance
The Tamil New Year follows the Nirayanam vernal equinox and generally falls either on 13 or 14 April of the Gregorian year. 13 or 14 April marks the first day of the traditional Tamil calendar and is a public holiday in both Tamil Nadu and Sri Lanka. Tropical vernal equinox fall around 22 March, and adding 23 degrees of trepidation or oscillation to it, we get the Hindu sidereal or Nirayana Mesha Sankranti (Sun’s transition into Nirayana Aries).
Hence, the Tamil calendar begins on the same date observed by most traditional calendars in India as in Assam, Bengal, Kerala, Manipur, Mithila, Orissa, Punjab, Tripura etc. not to mention Nepal, Bangladesh, Burma, Cambodia, Laos, Sri Lanka and Thailand. The 60-year cycle is ancient and is observed by most traditional calendars of India and China, and is related to 5 revolutions of Jupiter, or to 60-year orbit of Nakshatras (stars) as described in the Surya Siddhanta.
The traditional Tamil year starts on 13 April 2012, Kaliyuga 5114. Vikrama and Shalivahana Saka eras are also used. There are several references in early Tamil literature to the April new year. Nakkirar, the author of the Nedunalvaadai writes in the 3rd century that the Sun travels from Mesha/Chitterai through 11 successive Raasis or signs of the zodiac.[2] Kūdalūr Kizhaar in the 3rd century refers to Mesha Raasi/Chitterai as the commencement of the year in the Puranaanooru. The Tolkaapiyam is the oldest surviving Tamil grammar that divides the year into six seasons where Chitterai marks the start of the Ilavenil season or summer. The 8th century Silappadikaaram mentions the 12 Raasis or zodiac signs starting with Mesha/Chitterai. The Manimekalai alludes to the Hindu solar calendar as we know it today. Adiyarkunalaar, an early medieval commentator or Urai-asiriyar mentions the 12 months of the Tamil calendar with particular reference to Chitterai. There were subsequent inscriptional references in Pagan, Burma dated to the 11th century CE and in Sukhothai, Thailand dated to the 14th century CE to South Indian, often Vaishnavite, courtiers who were tasked with defining the traditional calendar that began in mid-April.
Celebration
Tamil people celebrate Tamil new year either on 13 or 14 April. Every year in the month of Chitterai (the first month of the Tamil solar calendar in April), in the temple city of Madurai, the Chitterai Thiruvizha is celebrated in the Meenakshi Temple. A huge exhibition is held, called Chitterai Porutkaatchi. In some parts of Southern Tamil Nadu, it is called Chitterai Vishu. The day is marked with a feast in Tamil homes and entrances to the houses are decorated elaborately with kolams. In most parts of India, one can see neem trees blooming with their flowers and the first batch of mangoes hanging prominently. This day is celebrated by some communities with neem flowers and raw mangoes to symbolize growth and prosperity.

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Martyrs Days, Jan. 30

Martyrs’ Day, Jan. 2012

Martyrs’ Day marks the death anniversary of the father of nation, Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, who was assassinated on Jan 30, 1948, by Nathuram Godse. Godse held Gandhi responsible for the partition of India thus he shot Gandhiji. For this evil deed Godse was hanged on November 15, 1949.

Originally the martyrdom of the soldiers while defending the sovereignty of the country during the freedom struggle was remembered on Republic Day, January 26, gave way to Jan 30.

On this day not only Prime Minister and chiefs of the armed forces salute the martyrs at India Gate but also common men show their gratitude towards them by giving up their normal activities for some time and observing silence for 2 minutes.

Sirens are blown at every government establishment around 11 am. At that time everyone, be it in industrial units or government offices even the
commoners stop their work and observe silence for two minutes as a remembrance of the martyred souls. The siren again blows after two minutes, i.e. around 11.02 am allowing resuming work.

The day sees the triumphant celebrations, showcasing the latest weapon achievement and advertising military might.

The followers of Mahatma Gandhi worship him and quote- He is the greatest human being so far appeared on this earth. Bapu is a symbol of virtues and greatness. This man lived the life of a saint.

His status of Father of the Nation cannot be challenged as the political party led by him enjoyed full monopoly after independence. He believed in antiviolent ideologies. Gandhi and his followers played a significant role in ousting British.

January, 30 is a Martyrs’ day to remember the freedom fighters of our country, wheras January 25, is considered as a Martyrs’ day to remember those who lost their lives in the Anti-Hindi agitations during 1937-38 and 1965.

 

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National Book Week, 14-20, Nov.2013

Happy Book Week , My dear Readers !!! Expand your horizon of knoweledge via books........all through.......always....all ways

National Book Week, Nov.14-20, 2013

National Book Week, 2013

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World Book DayNovember 20th, 2013
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