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World Blood Donor Day, June 14, 2012

World Blood Donor Day

On 14 June, countries worldwide celebrate World Blood Donor Day with events to raise awareness of the need for safe blood and blood products and to thank voluntary unpaid blood donors for their life-saving gifts of blood.

The theme for World Blood Donor Day 2011 is, “More blood. More life.” This theme reinforces the urgent need for more people all over the world to become life-savers by volunteering to donate blood regularly.

Every year, countries throughout every region of the world organize a huge variety of events and activities to celebrate the day, from football matches to free concerts, and from mobile blood donation clinics to monumental decorations.

Why should we donate blood?

Safe blood saves lives and improves health. Blood transfusion is needed for:

  • women with complications of pregnancy, such as ectopic pregnancies and haemorrhage before, during or after childbirth;
  • children with severe anaemia often resulting from malaria or malnutrition;
  • people with severe trauma following accidents; and
  • many surgical and cancer patients.

It is also needed for regular transfusions for people with conditions such as thalassaemia and sickle cell disease and is used to make products such as clotting factors for people with haemophilia. There is a constant need for regular blood supply because blood can be stored for only a limited time before use. Regular blood donations by a sufficient number of healthy people are needed to ensure that safe blood will be available whenever and wherever it is needed.

Blood is the most precious gift that anyone can give to another person – the gift of life. A decision to donate your blood can save a life or even several if your blood is separated into its components – red cells, platelets and plasma – which can be used individually for patients with specific conditions.

Who can donate blood?

Any healthy adult can donate blood: men once in every three months and women every four months. The universally accepted criteria for donor selection are:

  • Age – 18 to 55 years
  • Haemoglobin : not less than 12.5 g/dL
  • Pulse : between 50 and 100/minute with no irregularities
  • Blood Pressure : Systolic 90 : 180 mmHg and Diastolic 50 : 100 mmHg
  • Temperature : Normal (oral temperature not exceeding 37.5 degree C)
  • Body weight : not less than 46 Kg

Who can not donate blood?

  1. Pregnant or lactating women, or those who have recently had an abortion or miscarriage
  2. Those who are on steroids, hormonal supplements or certain specified medication
  3. Persons with sexually transmitted diseases or infections like HIV or those who are addicted to drugs
  4. Those who have had an infection like jaundice, rubella, typhoid or malaria
  5. Persons who have undergone surgery in the previous six months
  6. Persons who have consumed alcohol in the 24 hours prior to donation
  7. Women should avoid donation during their menstruating period

Common myths about blood donation

  1. I can get infection while donating blood
    Fact – Sterile equipment is used, which limits the chance of infection.
  2. It’s not healthy to donate blood.
    Fact – Provided that you’re healthy prior giving blood, your health will not deteriorate after donating blood. One should take a few hours of rest after donation.
  3. The process is very time consuming
    Fact – A single donation session normally does not take more than an hour.
  4. My haemoglobin will dip after donating
    Fact – Not more than 470 ml of blood is taken at one session. Your body replaces this in a very short period of time. Donating blood does not lead to any decrease in your haemoglobin level.
  5. Elderly people can not donate blood
    Fact – Anyone up to the age of 60 years and is fit and healthy can donate blood
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May 17 – World Information Society Day

World Information Society Day

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

World Information Society Day was proclaimed to be on 17 May by a United Nations General Assembly resolution, following the 2005 World Summit on the Information Society in Tunis.

The day had previously been known as World Telecommunication Day to commemorate the founding of the International Telecommunication Union in 17 May 1865. It was instituted by the Plenipotentiary Conference in Malaga-Torremolinos in 1973.

The main objective of the day is to raise global awareness of societal changes brought about by the Internet and new technologies. It also aims to help reduce the Digital divide.

World Information Society Day

In November 2005, the World Summit on the Information Society called upon the UN General Assembly to declare 17 May as World Information Society Day to focus on the importance of ICT and the wide range of issues related to the Information Society raised by WSIS. The General Assembly adopted a resolution (A/RES/60/252) in March 2006 stipulating that World Information Society Day shall be celebrated every year on 17 May. The first World Information Society Day took place on Wednesday, 17 May 2006.

World Telecommunication and Information Society Day

In November 2006, the ITU Plenipotentiary Conference in Antalya, Turkey, decided to celebrate both events on 17 May as World Telecommunication and Information Society Day. The updated Resolution 68 invites Member States and Sector Members to celebrate the day annually by organizing appropriate national programmes with a view to:

  • stimulating reflection and exchanges of ideas on the theme adopted by the Council
  • debating the various aspects of the theme with all partners in society
  • formulating a report reflecting national discussions on the issues underlying the theme, to be fed back to ITU and the rest of its membership

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May Day ( Labour Day)

May Day

A cornucopia of holidays

by Shmuel Ross

May 1st, often called May Day, just might have more holidays than any other day of the year. It’s a celebration of Spring. It’s a day of political protests. It’s a neopagan festival, a saint’s feast day, and a day for organized labor. In many countries, it is a national holiday.

Beltane

Beltane was a Celtic calendar feast ushering in the start of summer. (It also went by a variety of other spellings and names in assorted dialects of Gaelic.)

Bonfires, often created by rubbing sticks together, were common features of Beltane celebrations. Related rituals included driving cattle between two fires, dancing around the fires, and burning witches in effigy. Another tradition was Beltane cakes, which would be broken into several pieces, one of which was blackened. They would be drawn by celebrants at random; the person getting the unlucky blackened piece would face a mock execution.

In recent years, Beltaine has been adopted or revived by neopagan groups as a major seasonal festival.

Walpurgisnacht

St. Walburga (or Walpurgis), the abbess of the monastery of Heidenheim, helped St. Boniface bring Christianity to 8th Century Germany. She died on Feb. 25, 779. As her remains have been moved on multiple occasions, several days have been designated in her honor, one of which is the first of May.

This date coincided with a pre-existing pagan festival, which, in Germany, included rites to protect one against witchcraft. This led to a hybrid legend developing, in which witches were said to meet with the Devil on the eve of May 1, on the Brocken peak. The night of April 30th became known as “Walpurgisnacht,” and the annual meeting was dramatized by Goethe in Faust.

Fertility Festivals

Some cultures, such as those found in Indiaand Egypt, had spring fertility festivals. The Roman festival celebrating Flora, goddess of fertility, flowers, and spring, was celebrated from April 28 through May 3.

Bringing in the May

In medieval England, people would celebrate the start of spring by going out to the country or woods—”going a-maying”—and gathering greenery and flowers, or “bringing in the may.” This was described in “The Court of Love” (often attributed to Chaucer, but not actually written by him) in 1561:

And furthgoth all the Court, both most and lest,
To feche the flouresfressh, and braunche and blome;
And namly, hawthorn brought both page and grome.
With fressh garlandes, partie blewe and whyte,
And thaim rejoysen in their greet delyt.

(For modern spellings, hold your mouse pointer over unfamiliar words.)

Another English tradition is the maypole. Some towns had permanent maypoles that would stay up all year; others put up a new one each May. In any event, the pole would be hung with greenery and ribbons, brightly painted, and otherwise decorated, and served as a central point for the festivities.

May Day was also a time for morris dancing and other dances, often around the maypole. In the 19th century, people began to braid the maypole with ribbons by weaving in and out in the course of a dance. Other later traditions include making garlands for children and the crowning of the May Queen.

Labor Day

In many countries, May Day is also Labor Day. This originates with the United Stateslabor movement in the late 19th Century. On May 1, 1886, unions across the country went on strike, demanding that the standard workday be shortened to eight hours. The organizers of these strikes included socialists, anarchists, and others in organized labor movements. Rioting in Chicago’s Haymarket Square on May 4th including a bomb thrown by an anarchist led to the deaths of a dozen people (including several police officers) and the injury of over 100 more.

The protests were not immediately successful, but they proved effective down the line, as eight-hour work days eventually did become the norm. Labor leaders, socialists, and anarchists around the world took the American strikes and their fallout as a rallying point, choosing May Day as a day for demonstrations, parades, and speeches. It was a major state holiday in theSoviet Unionand other communist countries.

Labor Day is still celebrated on May1 incountries around the world, and it is still often a day for protests and rallies. In recent years, these have often been targeted against globalization.

2006: May Day Protests Return to theU.S.

In 2006,United Statesonce again saw widespread political action on May Day this year, centering on the subject of immigration reform. Various groups and communities, under the heading of “A Day Without Immigrants,” held rallies, strikes, and consumer boycotts to support the rights of those working and living in theUnited States, and to protest a bill that would deport many illegal immigrants.

Competing Holidays

Various authorities have tried to ban or undermine May Day, particularly the communist observances during the Cold War. In 1955, Pope Pius XII designated May 1 as a feast day of St. Joseph the Worker. In 1958, President Eisenhower designated May 1 as both Law Day and Loyalty Day. Each of these were specifically aimed at replacing the communist holiday with a religious or patriotic one.

May Day Bank Holiday

In theUnited Kingdom, the first Monday of May is a bank holiday. Since May 1 does not always fall on a Monday, May Day festivities have been moved to the Monday bank holiday for the public’s convenience. Some communities inEnglandstill commence celebrations at sunset on April 30 with processions through town centres and floral decorations. Padstow holds the annual Obby Oss, which is thought to be the oldest May Day celebration in the country dating back to the 13th century.

Read more: May Day — Infoplease.com http://www.infoplease.com/spot/mayday.html#ixzz1tb5EtzeS

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Important Days in April

Important Days in April

1. APRIL

2.APRIL

3.APRIL

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Creative New Year 2014

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National Book Week, 14-20, Nov.2013

Happy Book Week , My dear Readers !!! Expand your horizon of knoweledge via books........all through.......always....all ways

National Book Week, Nov.14-20, 2013

National Book Week, 14-20, Nov.2014

National Book Week, 2013

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World Book DayNovember 20th, 2013
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